10 Fun Photo Opportunities

Nearly everything in Sequoia National Park is photo-worthy, but here is a list of essential pictures to take during your visit. (If you’re feeling brave, make it a scavenger hunt!)

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©Archer & Hound Advertising

1. General Sherman Tree

– As the largest tree in the world by volume, the General Sherman Tree is an essential stop for photos. Your challenge: find a way to get the entire tree in one picture. (Good luck!)


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©Archer & Hound Advertising

2. Sequoia National Park Sign

– This iconic sign, featuring a Native American in a headdress, is located at the entrance of the park, so be ready to snap a picture as you are riding in. It will be on the right side of the entrance just after you go through the park gates.


©Jens Karlsson

Park Ranger showing the way, ©Jens Karlsson

3. With a Ranger

– You can always find a ranger at the Lodgepole Visitor’s Center. Once you’ve asked them some questions about the park, you can commemorate your learning experience with a picture.


Moro Rock - Sequoia National Park, ©Charles Agnew

Moro Rock – Sequoia National Park, ©Charles Agnew

4. View from Moro Rock

– Moro Rock is an incredible sight to behold, but it’s got nothing on the view from the top. You can see for miles; the Great Western Divide in one direction, and the Generals Highway in the other, as well as the Central San Joaquin Valley.


©Roaming Together

©Roaming Together

5. Tokopah Falls

– The thundering falls are a great picture spot, as well as a great place to rest after your hike up to see them. Be careful near the falls in late spring and early summer, however, because it can get slippery.


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©Archer & Hound Advertising

6. Wildlife

– The abundant wildlife in Sequoia National Park should give you plenty of opportunities to take pictures, but you’ll have to keep a watchful eye, because some of them can be sneaky. Local species include the gray fox, black bear, bobcat, striped skunk, California quail, acorn woodpecker and white-footed mouse.


©kms306

©kms306

7. Inside Tharp’s Log

– One of the most remarkable things about Tharp’s Log, the first man-made structure in Sequoia National Park, is that you can still look inside today and see pretty much the same things Hale Tharp saw when he built it in the 1860s. Peek inside and take a photo.


©Yvon Maurice

©Yvon Maurice

8. With Horseback Riders

– Many of the hiking trails in Sequoia National Park also allow horseback riders, so if you see a group during your visit, ask them to stop for a photo. If the horses are friendly and the owner says it is okay, you may even be able to pet them!


©Mistiec_Flores

©Mistiec_Flores

9. Tunnel Log’s Roots

– The Tunnel Log, a fallen tree with an arch cut into it for cars to drive through, is a great picture opportunity not just because of the tunnel itself, but because this fallen tree allows a glimpse of the root system of Giant Sequoias that is normally underground.


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©Archer & Hound Advertising

10. Tunnel Rock

– Soon after you enter the park, look to the left and you will be able to take a picture of Tunnel Rock, a large stone formation allowing visitors to walk underneath. The road used to allow cars to drive through, but after the Generals Highway was widened, it was deemed unsafe.


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